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Clever Tips for Crocheting with the C2C Method


Are you eager to expand your skillset and begin using multiple colours in your corner-to-corner crochet projects? With a bit of practice, you'll be an expert at alternating graph hues in no time. Allow me to show you how!







Tips for Crocheting with the C2C


I have developed five distinct rules for changing colours when creating a corner-to-corner crochet graph, which I will go into further detail about here.


USE THE 5:2 CHAIN RATIO FOR CORNER TO CORNER

For those working on a corner-to-corner afghan, one can start each row with either 5 or 6 chains. Subsequently, to initiate each block, one must either chain 2 or 3 respectively. My personal preference is the 5:2 method, as it yields a more subtle transition between colours due to smaller holes between the blocks. If you'd like a more comprehensive explanation, this post can provide the details.



CHANGE COLORS WITH THE SLIP STITCHES

Despite breaking my own personal guideline of colour-switching, when crocheting corner to corner, I use a slip stitch to transition colours instead of a regular pull-through. Is this important? Likely not.


DON’T CARRY THE YARN TOO FAR

When I don't clip and reattach my yarn, and instead choose to carry it for more than one block's width away, it results in a messier and more wrinkled look than when I reattach it. It's true that this causes more ends that need to be woven in, but the result is more even colour changes and a nicer final look. My own personal rule is to only carry the yarn no more than one block away. Even though this involves more effort, it is worth it.

Moreover, if I reattach the yarn, I can go back and tighten the ends after a few rows, making everything look even better, and also helping refine the colour transitions. On the other hand, if the yarn is carried further away, the only option is to weave in the ends and accept them as is.


BOBBINS ARE YOUR BEST FRIEND


Creating a corner-to-corner graph requires a strategy to ensure the yarn stays tidy while working on the project. Otherwise, you may end up dealing with an unappealing mess of tangled yarn.

To prevent my yarn from becoming tangled, I use industrial clips. Before attaching the yarn to the clip, I analyze my chart and observe the number of blocks I will require when the next row appears. If, as I examine the chart, I know I will require six blocks, so I can wrap enough yarn around the bobbin to complete these blocks. Afterwards, I clip the bobbin onto my project and keep moving forward.

To obtain a better estimation of how much yarn to wind around your bobbins per block, try this simple trick: crochet one block and then unravel it to measure the amount of yarn used.


WEAVE IN ENDS AS YOU GO (BUT NOT TOO SOON)

As I crochet a corner-to-corner graphic with many colour changes, I prefer to weave in yarn ends along the way to avoid tangles when I turn my work. However, if I am too close to the working yarn, I find the blocks become overly tight and distort the appearance.

Generally, I opt to not thread ends that are situated within two to three rows from the one I'm working on. When weaving them in, I make sure to run my yarn needle back and forth twice, as well as go through the fibres of the yarn.




To see a more detailed explanation of the tips you’ll want to watch this video ~ Heart Hook Home ~

(Ashlea Konecny presents all the above-mentioned tips in crocheting using the C2C method in a very clear way)


MORE CROCHET TIPS AND TUTORIALS on my blog:

Basics for C2C crocheting - Chain Stitch, Double Crochet Stitch and Slip Stitch

Crocheting C2C methods - one colour

How to change colours by crocheting the C2C method

Basic crochet terms in 5 languages: English, American, Polish, German and French


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